International Organization at War: NATO Practices in the Afghan Campaign

I just published an article on NATO in Afghanistan in the journal Cooperation and Conflict. The article is available online and in PDF. I reproduce the abstract below:

This article investigates the NATO campaign in Afghanistan through a practice-based approach. The structural distribution of power within NATO, which is obviously in favor of the US, does not automatically lead to Washington’s desired outcomes, and US delegates must competently perform a certain number of practices for their power advantage to take its full effect. The article also illustrates how looking at practices helps to explain policy decisions, such as NATO’s decision to engage in Afghanistan, the establishment of an International Security and Assistance Force (ISAF) strategy and the wording of policy papers. By studying a case of military diplomacy, the article contributes to the emerging scholarship aimed at bridging the gap between diplomatic studies and practice-based approaches to International Relations.

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The Impact of Institutions on Foreign Policy Think-Tanks in France and Denmark

I published with my colleague Jon Rahbek-Clemmensen a piece in The International Spectator comparing the French and Danish think-tanks. The article is available here and can be downloaded here. I reproduce the abstract below.

Even though France is an active player on the world stage, its foreign and security think tank milieu is smaller than that of similar powers, most notably the United Kingdom. Comparing French think tanks with those in Denmark illustrates how French institutional structures constrain think tank activities. France’s political tradition of centralisation, its non-academic civil service education, and separation of academia and administration create an environment in which think tanks are underfunded and walk a fine line between an over-controlling administration and a suspicious academia. Some French think tanks perform well in spite of these structures, which indicates that they could flourish and compete at the highest international level if given better structural conditions.

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The Causes, Character and Conduct of Internal Armed Conflict, and the Effects on Civilian Populations

I published a book chapter co-authored with Theo Farrell on the evolution of the character of internal armed conflicts, and the consequences for people fleeing mass violences (refugees and internally displaced people).
The chapter is the analytical foundation for discussions on the legal instruments of civilian protection, and potential rooms for improvement and updates.

The project was supported by the UNHCR.

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